The Story of Iconic Photos: Man on the Moon

What could be more memorable than landing on the moon? Not much. This iconic photograph was taken in 1969 when astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin of the Apollo 11 mission landed and walked on the lunar surface.

The image of Aldrin standing in a light grey desert, brightly lit with blinding white light and a stark black background was enough for many to question its legitimacy. It was like nothing we had ever seen before, except in our imagination and artistic renderings. Perhaps that’s why it stands as such a strong image in our minds. It is proof that even what may seem impossible can be accomplished.
One interesting fact about the lunar pictures is that they are all of Aldrin. Armstrong took all the still photos, and therefore is not in any of them. The only exception is his reflection which can be seen in Aldrin’s visor in this one image. Also visible in his visor is the lunar landing module and his elongated shadow. One of the first to stretch across the moon’s surface. The first person to do something is always held in a special place in our societal memory, and this is an image that will stay with us throughout the duration of human history.
Related: 5 Photography Tips to Photograph the Moon
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